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Sober Nation

Putting Recovery On The Map

07-20-18 | By

It’s Been Five Years And We Won’t Forget Him.

“When you lose someone who is such a big part of you, you lose all purpose for living. A part of me died when Cory did. My world stopped and I didn’t think I’d ever get up from it.”

Last Friday marked the fifth anniversary of the death of actor and Glee star Cory Monteith, and in a recent interview, his Mother reflects on the tragic loss of her only son.

“I Just Shut Off All Emotions, and I Was Numb.”

At the age of 31, the star was found dead in a hotel room in Vancouver on July 13, 2013. Heroin, alcohol, traces of morphine, and codeine were found in his system at the time. The actor, who had struggled with drug addiction was dating his co-star, Lea Michele at the time of his passing. In a recent interview, Monteith’s Mother remembers the moment his girlfriend broke the news of his tragic death, and noted that a dental operation months before could have derailed his sobriety.

Ann McGregor stated, “I got a call from Lea and she was screaming on the phone. She was yelling, ‘Is it true, is it true about Cory?’ and I said, ‘What about Cory?’ And then police knocked on my front door. I went into a state of numbness. I just shut off all emotions, and I was numb.”

Just months before his death, Monteith was in a month-long rehab program in April 2013. McGregor said the dental work was done between May and July.

“Cory had a massive amount of dental work. He had little teeth and they were all capped. He had a lot of medication in his system, which was not good for his body coming out of rehab.”

“He didn’t have enough drugs in his system to kill him, but for some reason it did because of his intolerance [built up by periods of intermittent sobriety],” she said in the interview.

Remembering Cory

The young actor was 13 years old when he started experimenting with drugs and alcohol. His Mother notes, “He was a very vulnerable young man all the way through his life. I raised him to be honest and open and I raised him with love, but I did not teach him about the other side of the world. There’s a bad side out there.

At 15, McGregor checked Cory into rehab, however after a 30 day stay, he relapsed and was again in rehab at the age of 19.

“I realized that rehab is not the answer,” says McGregor. “You have to get these children before they get into that stuff. I never had the power to stop him.

However, with sustained sobriety for an amount of time, and after moving to Los Angeles, the young actor found success in small parts before making his star-studded role on Glee.

“He Was Just Too Grounded”

However, his Mother notes that Monteith never felt comfortable with the fame and attention. “He called that world plastic,” says McGregor. “It was too superficial for him. He was just too grounded and his heart was too intact. He couldn’t become hard enough.”

McGregor says Monteith began using drugs again as a way to escape the pressures of Hollywood. “He was stressed because he wanted to get out of that world but he couldn’t because he had two more years left on his contract. Drugs were his way of checking out.”

Five years later, the 67-year-old single mother still reflects on her enormous loss. “I still can’t pick up the pieces. My world totally stopped. And I’m a different person than I was before.”

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