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Sober Nation

Putting Recovery On The Map

12-03-13 | By

Helping a Family Member Find Recovery

Few things are more painful than watching a loved one suffer from an alcohol or drug addiction, and you might wish that there was a way to help your family member stop using for good. Fortunately, it is possible to help your loved one get the help that he or she needs. Although it might not be an easy road, it will all be worthwhile when your family member is able to live a happy, healthy and sober life.

helping a family member get into treatment

Consult a Professional

Although you might think that you know how to handle this type of situation, it is important to seek professional assistance when you can. It can be very difficult to reach out to addicted individuals, no matter how much you love the person in question. Someone who is experienced in helping people who are in need of treatment can give you tips and advice for assisting your loved one in getting help.

Consider Different Options for Intervention

Intervention is never easy for anyone who is involved, but it is an essential part of helping your loved one get the help that he or she needs. There are different ways to go about an intervention, so consider your options so that you can choose the method that is best for you and your loved one’s situation.

Should you hire an interventionist? – Hiring someone who is experienced in handling interventions can be highly beneficial and can help encourage your loved one to seek the help that he or she needs for an alcohol or drug addiction. An interventionist can also help prevent things from escalating during your conversation about your loved one’s addiction.

Should you bring other family members into it? – You might be wondering if you should attempt to help your loved one on your own or if you should bring others into it. Luckily, bringing as much support as possible can really help. When inviting others to the intervention, however, make sure that you only bring people who really want to see your loved one get well.

What should you say? – Thinking about what to say during an intervention isn’t easy, so take your time and write down what you want to address during the meeting. It’s also a good idea to encourage the others who will be there to do the same. When deciding what to say, remember not to beat around the bush and to tell your loved one exactly how serious you think the problem is.

Should there be consequences? – Unfortunately, there is a good chance that you or someone else in your family member’s life is enabling the addiction more than you think. Establishing clear consequences, such as no longer giving the loved one money or no longer allowing him or her to live in the house, is a good way to encourage change.

What do you do if the family member says no? – Going into an intervention, you will obviously want your family member to say yes to getting help for his or her addiction. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. If your loved one refuses to admit that there is a problem or refuses to seek help, it is important to enforce any mentioned consequences and to stick true to your word. Also, remember to follow up later to see if your loved one will get help in the future.

Don’t Take it Personally

One thing that you have to remember when helping your addicted loved one is that addicts aren’t in the right state of mind. Unfortunately, it is common for addicted individuals to lie, sneak around, steal and lash out, and these things can be extremely hurtful for the people who love them. Although you might feel like giving up when dealing with a family member who is acting this way, it is important not to take things personally or to give up on your addicted loved one.

Encourage Treatment

Your addicted loved one might claim that he or she can quit drinking or using drugs without professional assistance, but you should always encourage treatment in a professional setting. In some cases, addicts claim that they will quit when they actually plan to simply hide their addictions better. In other situations, addicted individuals do intend to try their best to stay off of the drugs and to quit drinking alcohol, but this can prove to be incredibly challenging.

When someone who is addicted to drugs or alcohol is on the streets without any professional assistance, it is very easy for him or her to relapse very quickly. Chances are good that there is a liquor store right down the road, and drug addicts can usually find a way to get to their drug dealers. It can be too much for an addicted individual to try to say no to their addictions when they are so close by.

Withdrawal symptoms can also be very uncomfortable, which can cause your loved one to relapse even if he or she doesn’t want to. Some withdrawal symptoms are even dangerous and life-threatening, and your family member might need medical assistance in order to make it through the withdrawal period safely.

If you are truly ready to help your loved one get sober, you need to encourage professional treatment. Luckily, you can contact us at (866) 317-7050 for more information about helping your addicted family member find the treatment that he or she needs.

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